Marjan Keršič – Belač, Sculptor, Alpinist and Mountain Rescuer
20. 2. 2020 to 10. 5. 2020
20. 2. 2020 to 10. 5. 2020

Marjan Keršič – Belač, Sculptor, Alpinist and Mountain Rescuer –

Authors of the exhibition: Jožica Šparovec, Marjeta Keršič Svetel
On view between  Febraury 20, 2020 and May 3, 2020
Guided tours: first Sundays of the month at 11.00 (1st March, 5th April, 3rd May 2020)

At the exhibition prepared by the National Museum of Contemporary History on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the birth of Marjan Keršič-Belač, in collaboration with his daughter Marjeta Keršič Svetel, we show a selection of photographs, predominantly from the museum photographic fund of Marjan Keršič-Belač, with a focus on the first Slovene and Yugoslav Himalayan expedition to Trisul, India, in 1960, and also on the theme of mountaineering in the Slovenian mountains from 1939-1950. Some rare shots are on display of Slovene climbers and their ascents in the Kamnik Alps and on the North Triglav Face, from 1939 and from the years immediately after World War II. The exhibition also commemorates the 60th anniversary of the first expedition to Trisul. The exhibited photographs, consisting of colour slides and black and white negatives, donated to the Museum by Marjeta Keršič Svetel, are supplemented with film and archive material and some items from the collections of the Museum of Contemporary History of Slovenia and the private collections of Marjeta Keršič Svetel and Arne Hodalič.

Marjan Keršič-Belač (May 18, 1920, Ljubljana, † June 3, 2003, Ljubljana) excelled in several fields. His work as an academic sculptor was fruitful, since in public spaces alone stand 82 monuments, including many busts of famous Slovenes. He was also a top mountaineer, completing 340 climbing routes in his life and, in 1960, as a member of the first Slovene and Yugoslav expedition to the Himalayas, Trisul, India, stood at the top of the 6,270 m high Trisul III. He was also a mountain rescuer, mountain guide and ski instructor and received many awards for his work.
He began to study sculpture at the private studio of academic sculptor Boris Kalin, as a 15-year-old boy in 1935, when, precisely because of Kalin he also began to walk in the mountains. He cooperated with the OF during the 2nd World War, was arrested several times and finally sent to Gonars concentration camp. In 1945, he enrolled at the Academy of Fine Arts in Ljubljana and in 1949 completed his studies of sculpture under Prof. Boris Kalin. From 1962 to 1966, he taught sculpture techniques at the School of Fine Design in Ljubljana.

Bogomir Flander (partisan name Klusov Joža, 2nd from right) among Italian soldiers at the top of Triglav, 1939, photo: Marjan Keršič – Belač.
Bogomir Flander (partisan name Klusov Joža, 2nd from right) among Italian soldiers at the top of Triglav, 1939, photo: Marjan Keršič – Belač.
Ante Mahkota climbs an icy overhang, at the beginning of the path towards the summit of Trisul III, at the key and most difficult place of the whole ascent, 7 June 1960, photo: Marjan Keršič – Belač.
Ante Mahkota climbs an icy overhang, at the beginning of the path towards the summit of Trisul III, at the key and most difficult place of the whole ascent, 7 June 1960, photo: Marjan Keršič – Belač.
Mountaineer Marjan Keršič – Belač on Trisul II, India, in camp 3 (6.200 m). Around 27 May 1960, photo: unknown author.
Mountaineer Marjan Keršič – Belač on Trisul II, India, in camp 3 (6.200 m). Around 27 May 1960, photo: unknown author.
In Gwaldam, members of the expedition repacked the cargo and prepared it for transfer by porters to the base below Trisul. 21 April 1960, photo: Marjan Keršič – Belač.
In Gwaldam, members of the expedition repacked the cargo and prepared it for transfer by porters to the base below Trisul. 21 April 1960, photo: Marjan Keršič – Belač.