The Marjan Keršič ¬– Belač Fonds (1939–1965)

Curator: Jožica Šparovec<


Marjan Keršič – Belač (18.5.1920–3.6.2003) was a renowned academic sculptor, well-respected and great mountaineer, mountain rescuer, mountain guide and ski instructor who received several awards for his work. In 1960, he was a member of the first Yugoslav Himalayan expedition to Trisul, India, where he also took a great number of photographs. In 2017 and 2018, Keršič’s daughter, Mrs. Marjeta Keršič Svetel, donated to the National Museum of Contemporary History 1,000 of Keršič’s colour transparencies and black-and-white and colour negatives from the period between 1939 and 1960, mostly on the themes of alpinism and himalaism. The most notable images are the photographs of Slovene mountaineers and their ascents in the Kamnik-Savinja Alps and in the Triglav northern wall from the period before WW2 and from the early post-war period as well as the images from the first Slovene and Yugoslav Himalayan expedition in 1960.

During the expedition to the Trishul peaks, Aleš Kunaver recorded the first Slovene and Yugoslav Himalayan film, India, 1960. Inv. no.: MKB12.
During the expedition to the Trishul peaks, Aleš Kunaver recorded the first Slovene and Yugoslav Himalayan film, India, 1960. Inv. no.: MKB12.
Native woman with her ornaments, during the expedition to the Trishuls, India, 1960. Inv. no.: MKB2
Native woman with her ornaments, during the expedition to the Trishuls, India, 1960. Inv. no.: MKB2
Village school, India, Ghes, 1960. Inv. no. : MKB97.
Village school, India, Ghes, 1960. Inv. no. : MKB97.
From Gwaldam, the last settlement on their way to the Trishul, the members of the expedition caught sight of their peaks (in the middle), on the left Nanda Devi, the first destination of the expedition, India, Gwaldam, 1960. Inv. no. : MKB68.
From Gwaldam, the last settlement on their way to the Trishul, the members of the expedition caught sight of their peaks (in the middle), on the left Nanda Devi, the first destination of the expedition, India, Gwaldam, 1960. Inv. no. : MKB68.